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GUIDELINES FOR CAA INTERVIEWS

Adopted by the CAA Board of Directors in October 2000; revised in October 2006; revised in October 2013; revised on May 3, 2015.

Introduction

The College Art Association (CAA) is a learned society and professional association composed of individuals and institutions concerned with the advancement of scholarship and excellence in the teaching and practice of art history, art, and design.

In addition to its other functions, CAA is a central and effective link between those seeking and those offering teaching, curatorial, and administrative positions within the disciplines it encompasses. These guidelines have been formulated with the intent of protecting the interests of applicants and of hiring institutions and allowing both an awareness of their separate responsibilities during the interview process. They are not intended to supplant but to supplement legal standards for job interviews and should be considered in conjunction with other CAA documents including:

Standards for Professional Placement

Guidelines for Part-Time Professional Employment

Standards for Retention and Tenure for Visual Art and Design Faculty

Works in New Media: Recommendations for Formatting, Handling, and Screening of Works

CAA subscribes to the belief that effective position interviewing and screening processes hold the prospect of serving the profession beyond the interests of particular institutions and/or candidates. While this document is largely concerned with interviews at the CAA Annual Conference, additional counsel and resources are offered for practices to function beyond the limited purpose of successfully concluding position searches; these guidelines aspire to create an awareness of paths toward continual improvements in the profession.

Lastly, CAA strongly recommends that all interviewers become familiar with and adhere to the
human resources policies and protocols of their respective institutions.

I.   Standards for Candidate Interviews

Overall, and whether conducted at the CAA conference or elsewhere, interviews should proceed in such a manner as to respect the professional and personal integrity of the candidates. Interviews should take place promptly as scheduled; each applicant should be allowed sufficient time to develop her/his candidacy in some depth; and interviewers should be prepared to respond to legitimate questions about the institution, its nature, program, location, etc. (An up-to-date web site supplying this information can save valuable time and energy.)

Respect for the integrity of the interviewing process involves a reciprocal obligation on the part of candidates to come to interviews prepared with all necessary supporting materials and to follow established procedures and schedules in asserting or pursuing their claims upon the time and attention of the interviewers.

II.  Guidelines for Interviewers

CAA’s Standards for Professional Placement provides descriptions and criteria for position listings; nondiscriminatory listings; right to privacy; accuracy of listings; application deadlines; charade listings, screenings and notifications, return of materials, reports on position listings, interviewing; and oversight. In addition, CAA’s Standards for Retention and Tenure for Visual Art and Design Faculty outlines a framework for evaluating academic advancement within institutions. These documents contain information essential to writing a position description and launching a job search.

A supplementary and detailed description of an employer’s responsibilities with respect to interviews includes:

A. Communications with Candidates

  1. The institution should communicate a timeline and process to all applicants. A letter or email confirming receipt of each application containing: a general review of the search process; screening and/or interviewing timelines; and the name of the institutional contact, with contact information, for any candidate questions.
  2. When contacting a candidate for any meeting the institution should make clear the essential differences between a preliminary interview and a finalist interview. CAA understands and respects that human resources policies at hiring institutions may hold definitions and descriptions that differ from and supersede those offered in these guidelines. (Please see definitions and descriptions below: Section II. B.; and Section II. C.)
  3. The institution should contact candidates in a timely fashion to communicate the interview schedule, the location, the purposes, the content, the identities of all participants, and any reimbursement plan (if applicable).
  4. During or soon as possible after each interview the institution should communicate its anticipated timeline for action and for subsequent communications, including rejection letters or emails.
  5. For full-time positions communicate that the criteria for promotion, retention, and tenure for visual-arts faculty is professional development, teaching effectiveness, and service to the college or university.
  6. Institutions and their representatives should familiarize themselves with federal guidelines and laws related to discriminatory employment practices. It is particularly advisable to review available resources for determining questions prohibited by law and alternative questions for obtaining important insights about candidate qualifications. Information is available from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
  7. Institutions should take steps necessary to assure confidentiality and anonymity of candidates.
    1. Contacting professional references should only be done with the explicit permission of the candidate.
    2. The videotaping or other recording of candidates during interviews at the CAA conference or other venues is strongly discouraged. This practice creates an

B. Candidate Screenings and Preliminary Interviews

Screening is the process whereby an employer attempts to discern the qualifications of each applicant as weighed against the position description. Many institutions will set application deadlines such that initial screenings can be completed prior to the CAA Annual Conference.

A meeting with a candidate to advance this process is a preliminary interview and represents an opportunity for the institution to enhance its understanding of the qualifications of that applicant. Such meetings might take the form of a live meeting at a neutral site such as the CAA Annual Conference, on campus, or other locations; a telephone conversation or conference call; or a web-based or other video conferencing meeting. (See APPENDIX for Recommendations for Interviews via Web Based Video Conferencing Tools.)

CAA encourages member institutions conducting in-person preliminary interviews at professional conferences to also offer web-based or video conferencing for applicants unable to attend those conferences. These technologies offer ample opportunity for screening candidate qualifications in relation to the job description while reducing the financial risk/burden on candidates, especially for graduate students and contingent faculty.

Most meetings between applicants and employers at the CAA Annual Conference would be defined as preliminary interviews. Some general suggestions for successful preliminary interviews at the CAA Annual Conference include but are not limited to:

  • Schedule sufficient time for substantive, mutual exchange and learning between applicants and interviewers; thirty to forty-five minute meetings might be advisable.
  • Schedule short time blocks between meetings to accommodate unplanned overruns and to allow interviewers to become reacquainted with applicant materials for any subsequent meetings; ten to fifteen minutes might be advisable.
  • Begin and end meetings at agreed upon times whenever possible. If scheduling adjustments must be made, or if follow-up meetings desired, these should be convenient to both parties.
  • Communicate in advance about the availability of audio, visual, and/or other technologies to support discussions.
  • Consider carefully an appropriate number and the demographic distribution of institutional representatives.
  • Be knowledgeable about and familiar with the qualifications of each applicant prior to the meeting.
  • Visit with each candidate at the beginning of the meeting to introduce all participants, describe the format and time restrictions, and set expectations for ground to be covered.
  • Be honest, reflective, thoughtful, and thorough in describing the position, the institution, and any other pertinent considerations.
  • Conclude with a recap of any follow-up activities, communications, and timelines.
  • Maintain sensitivity and respect privacy to the best of one’s ability when the meeting conditions are semi-public, such as the interviewing tables at the CAA conference center.
  • Conduct meetings in neutral spaces such as the interviewing tables and booths provided at the conference by CAA or in hotel suites which offer neutral spaces outside of bedrooms. CAA does not condone interviewing candidates in hotel bedrooms.
  • Consider offering coffee, tea, water, or other beverages/refreshments while respecting the personal preferences of applicants.

Note: CAA considers it inappropriate for an institution to schedule or conduct an interview and/or meeting where more than one applicant might be present.

C. Preliminary Interview Follow Up 

As soon as possible after the interview the institution should communicate the anticipated timeline and next steps in the hiring process. A letter or an email to each candidate should suffice. Any “rejection” notices should be as cordial as possible thanking each candidate for her/his interest, for the interview, and wishing her/him well in their job search.

D. Finalist Interviews

Finalist interviews are meetings arranged at sites and times convenient to both parties—most often on the campus of the institution—wherein the employer 1) is considering a limited number of candidates already deemed to be qualified for the position and 2) assumes responsibility for all reasonable expenses for each and every candidate participating. Remote video-conferencing technologies are recommended as an agreeable and convenient method for screening candidates in preliminary interviews but are not recommended as a substitute for, or as being equivalent to, a live personal interview.  
 
As previously stated, CAA strongly recommends that all interviewers become familiar with and adhere to the human resources policies and protocols of their respective institutions. General suggestions for successful finalist interviews at the CAA Annual Conference are similar to those outlined for preliminary interviews (listed above in Section II., B.) with an additional expectation of more focused time and attention given to a limited and select number of candidates.

Finalist interviews on-campus or at neutral sites also hold an expectation of focused time and attention given to a limited and select number of candidates. Additional suggestions for successful finalist interviews include:

  • Visit with each candidate to describe the interview format and share expectations, ideally prior to the candidate’s arrival at the interview site.
  • Ask each candidate whether he/she has questions about the interview process, schedule, and/or the people the candidate will meet during the interview.
  • Make the interview schedule as clear as possible and share it in advance with each candidate, again, ideally prior to the candidate’s arrival at the interview site.
  • Schedule time for the candidate to rejuvenate between interview meetings; fifteen to thirty minutes every three hours might be advisable.
  • Schedule open or private time for the candidate to explore the institution, revisit areas of particular interest, and/or refresh.
  • The interview schedule should identify the individual(s) escorting/collecting/driving the candidate to and from airports, transit terminals, and lodging accommodations.
  • Schedule time at the end of the interview for the candidate to fully prepare for departure and travel.
  • For public presentations provide explicit descriptions of the timing; the venue; the availability and limitations of audio/visual technologies; the anticipated size and makeup of the audience; and guidelines for any audience question and answer segment. 
  • Remind all parties to the interview—both internal and external to the institution—of federal guidelines and laws related to discriminatory employment practices. As previously stated, it is particularly advisable to review available resources for determining questions prohibited by law (marital status, sexual orientation, age, disabilities, etc.)
  • In advance of the interview outline clearly all matters related to travel arrangements, reimbursements, and record keeping. These might include air and/or ground travel reservations; airport parking; taxi and ground transit; lodging reservations; meals; and other sundries. Be especially clear about institutional reimbursement policies, protocols, and limitations.
  • Meals are a likely component of a finalist interview. Consider offering dining alternatives where a variety of foods are available; diverse eating regimens can be accommodated; and candidates can maintain confidentiality about medical, dietary, religious, and other personal matters.
  • Conclude the interview with a recap of any follow-up activities, communications, and timelines for completing the search process.

E. Finalist Interview Follow Up

All candidates participating in finalist interviews should be notified as soon as possible about the institution’s hiring decision. A letter, an email, or a telephone call should suffice. Any negative decision notices should be as cordial as possible thanking the candidate for her/his interest, for the interview, and wishing them well in their job search. If a hiring decision has not been made or the process extended, all final interview candidates should be kept apprised of the situation.

III. Guidelines for Candidates

A. Candidates should refer to the Guidelines for Interviewers in this document (Section II. A­–E.) and become familiar with the recommendations for Communications with Candidates; Candidate Screenings and Preliminary Interviews; Preliminary Interview Follow Up; Finalist Interviews; and Finalist Interview Follow Up.

B. The Search and Hiring Process

  1. Full-Time, Part-Time, and Contingent Position Searches

    While CAA offers recommendations for best practices in position searches, institutional human resources policies/protocols typically guide actual practices and procedures. Generally speaking, institutions employ a more rigorous, detailed, inclusive, and systematic selection process when seeking full-time employees and may choose to follow abbreviated procedures when searching to fill part-time and/or contingent positions.
     
    The guidelines provided here are generally applicable to more rigorous search processes. Some recommendations might also be applicable to other types of searches. CAA respects that institutions often face conditions beyond their control and may have compelling and legitimate reasons for highly variable processes and timetables.

  2. Standard Timeline and Process

    Employers and candidates are best served by completing position searches well before the anticipated position start date. With many academic positions beginning in late summer or early fall each year, institutions often wish to conclude searches by the preceding spring.

    1. Search Committees: Institutions typically form search committees early in the process to screen, interview, and recommend candidates for hiring. Committees are often comprised of faculty and might also include staff; students; faculty or staff from other institutional units; members of the community; and others as selected by the institution. While it is generally the role of the search committee to identify, interview, and recommend qualified candidates, the unit administrator often holds responsibility for the final hiring choice. When part-time faculty positions are to be hired the full-time faculty members with related and appropriate expertise, generally in the same academic program or unit, should be consulted and make recommendations to the appropriate administrator through search committees or other appropriate screening protocols. 

    2. Applicant Screening: Screening is the process whereby an employer attempts to discern the qualifications of each applicant as weighed against the position description. Search committees usually commence with screening applicant materials shortly after the advertised application deadline. Many institutions will set application deadlines such that initial screenings can be completed prior to the CAA Annual Conference. Otherinstitutions may have earlier or later timetables.

    3. Preliminary Interviews: A meeting with a candidate to advance the screening process is a preliminary interview and represents an opportunity for the institution to enhance its understanding of the qualifications of that applicant. Some institutions schedule preliminary interviews and others do not.

      Preliminary interviews might take the form of a live meeting at a neutral site—such as the CAA Annual Conference, on campus, or other locations; a telephone conversation or conference call; or a web-based or other video conferencing meeting. Most meetings between applicants and employers at the CAA Annual Conference would be defined as preliminary interviews. (Please see Section II., B.)

      1. CAA Annual Conference Interviews:

        Try to schedule interviews prior to travelling to the conference. If possible, mention your intention to attend the conference and availability to meet in your application letter. Be certain to provide accurate and timely contact information so that interviewers can easily reach you in advance.

        If no prior arrangement or contact has been made with an employer, log into your Online Career Center account and follow the employer’s specific instructions regarding how the interviewer wants to be contacted (email, cellphone, etc.).

        Upon arrival at the conference familiarize yourself with the Candidate Center and consider attending the Career Services Orientation and Navigating the Conference session (usually presented Tuesday evening). 

        Some general suggestions for successful preliminary interviews at the annual conference include but are not limited to:

        • Try to schedule sufficient time for substantive, mutual exchange and learning; thirty to forty-five minute meetings might be advisable.
        • Schedule short time blocks between meetings to accommodate unplanned overruns.
        • Be prepared to begin and end meetings precisely at agreed upon times.
        • Communicate in advance about preferences for audio, visual, and/or other technologies to support discussions.
        • At the beginning of the meeting introduce yourself to all participants, ask about any format, time restrictions, and expectations for ground to be covered.
        • Be knowledgeable about and familiar with the institution, the academic programs, the student population, alumni, the community, and other pertinent information.
        • Be honest, reflective, thoughtful, and thorough in describing your goals, strengths, accomplishments, and any other pertinent considerations.
        • Conclude with a recap of your interest and inquire about any follow-up activities, communications, and timelines.
        • Maintain sensitivity toward and respect the confidentiality of the interviewers. 

      2. Interviews via Web Based Video Conferencing Tools: See APPENDIX (below) and carefully review the suggestions for interviews at the CAA Annual Conference (Section III. B., 2., c., i.)

      3. Telephone Interviews: Carefully review the suggestions for interviews at the CAA Annual Conference (Section III., B., 2., c., i.)

      4. Neutral Site Interviews: Carefully review the suggestions for interviews at the CAA Annual Conference (Section III., B., 2., c., i.)

    4. Finalist Interviews: These are meetings arranged at sites and times convenient to both parties—most often on the campus of the institution—wherein the employer 1) is considering a limited number of candidates already deemed to be qualified for the position and 2) assumes responsibility for all reasonable expenses for each and every candidate participating. Remote video-conferencing technologies are recommended as an agreeable and convenient method for screening candidates in preliminary interviews but are not recommended as a substitute for, or as being equivalent to, a live personal interview.  

      Finalist interviews on-campus or at neutral sites hold an expectation of focused time and attention given to a limited and select number of candidates. Suggestions for successful finalist interviews are listed above (Section II., C.). Additional considerations for candidates include:

      • Visit with the institutional contact to review the interview format, share questions, and establish expectations, ideally prior to arriving at the interview site.
      • Ask any pertinent questions about the interview process, the schedule, and/or the people you will meet during the interview.
      • Make certain the interview schedule is clear to you in advance, again, ideally prior to your arrival at the interview site.
      • Consider asking for open or private time for the candidate to explore the institution, revisit areas of particular interest, and/or refresh.
      • Ask whether you should bring and/or provide any new and previously un-reviewed application materials to the interview.
      • Ask whether you should bring and/or provide any new and previously un-reviewed application materials to the interview.
      • Ask for details about any public presentations: descriptions of the timing; the venue; the availability and limitations of audio/visual technologies; the anticipated size and makeup of the audience; and guidelines for any audience question and answer segment. 
      • Visit with the institutional contact in advance to review all matters related to travel arrangements, reimbursements, and record keeping. These might include air and/or ground travel reservations; airport parking; taxi and ground transit; lodging reservations; meals; and other sundries. Be especially clear about institutional reimbursement policies, protocols, and limitations.
      • Be prepared to begin and end meetings precisely at agreed upon times.
      • At the beginning of each meeting introduce yourself to all participants, ask about any format, time restrictions, and expectations for ground to be covered.
      • Be knowledgeable about and familiar with the institution, the academic programs, the student population, alumni, the community, and other pertinent information. Consider listening to podcast on Researching the Job at: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9968328/ResearchingtheJob.mp3
      • Be honest, reflective, thoughtful, and thorough in describing your goals, strengths, accomplishments, and any other pertinent considerations.
      • Conclude the interview with a recap of your interest and inquire about any follow-up activities, communications, and timelines for completing the search process.
      • Maintain sensitivity toward and respect the confidentiality of all interviewers. 

    5. Selection and Hiring

      At the completion of finalist interviews the search committee typically collects feedback from all involved in the interview process and arrives at a recommendation to present to the unit administrator or other appropriate hiring authority, who often holds responsibility for the final hiring choice. Committee recommendations may or may not include a ranking of candidates, depending upon institutional policies and/or administrative instructions to the committee.

      Finalist interview candidates should expect to be notified as soon as possible about the institution’s hiring decision. If a hiring decision has not been made or the process extended, candidates should expect to be kept apprised of the situation.

C. Communications with the Employer

  1. The institution should have advertised a complete position description with qualifications, and timeline. Review the listing carefully and follow the employer’s specific instructions regarding how the employer wants to be contacted (online application, mail, email, cellphone, etc.); whom should be contacted; and what materials should be included in a complete application.
  2. Be affirmative, honest, reflective, thoughtful, and thorough in describing the your goals, interests, strengths, accomplishments, and any other pertinent considerations in your first contact and throughout.
  3. If contacted at any point during the search process respond as quickly and professionally as possible to the person(s) inquiring.
  4. If contacted for a meeting, inquire about the differences between a preliminary interview and a finalist interview.
  5. As soon as possible after any interview communicate your continuing interest and inquire about any follow-up activities and/or materials necessary to enhance your application.
  6. As soon as possible after a finalist interview again communicate your continuing interest and inquire about any follow-up activities and/or materials necessary to enhance your application.
  7. Employ discretion and caution about contacting interviewers, commit members, and/or any affiliates of the hiring institution outside of communications specifically requested by the interviewer(s), search committee members, and/or institutional contact person(s). 

Authors and Contributors

Ad Hoc Committee on Guidelines for CAA Interviews (2012): Jim Hopfensperger, Western Michigan University (chair); Dana Clancy, Boston University; Joelle Deitrick, Florida State University; Michael Fahlund, CAA Deputy Director; Nicole Gibbs, Columbus College of Art & Design; Krista Hoefle, St. Mary’s College (IN); Dennis Ichiyama, Purdue University; Jason Lahr, University of Notre Dame; Emmanuel Lemakis, CAA Director of Programs; Dominic Marner, University of Guelph; Owen Mundy, Florida State University; David Sokol, University of Illinois-Chicago; Mel Ziegler, Vanderbilt University.

Submitted by CAA’s Professional Practices Committee: Michael Aurbach, Vanderbilt University (chair until August 2000); Irina Costache Mount St. Mary’s College/California State University, Northridge (chair after August 2000); Frederick Asher, University of Minnesota; Ellen T. Baird, University of Illinois, Chicago (ex-officio); Bruce Bobick, State University of West Georgia; Marilyn Brown, Tulane University; Debra Drexler, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa; Linda C. Hults, College of Wooster; Gary Keown, Southeastern Louisiana University; Ellen Konowitz, Vanderbilt University; Dewey Mosby, Colgate University.

APPENDIX I

Recommendations for Interviews via Web Based Video Conferencing Tools

Adopted by the CAA Board of Directors on October 27, 2013.

Conducting interviews remotely via web-based video conferencing tools offers benefits in terms of time, travel, and cost. Many laptops come with cameras (a.k.a. “webcams”) pre-installed; broadband is ubiquitous; and dependable conferencing software is generally free. As with any technology, challenges associated with hardware, software, and connectivity should be taken into consideration and not allowed to affect the response to the interviewee. General suggestions for successfully conducting these types of interviews:

  • Make every effort to employ the most up-to-date technology possible. For example, a powerful computer, a high-resolution webcam, and a fast internet connection can help the interview to run smoothly.
  • Connect to the internet directly via an ethernet cable if possible. This connection is much faster (100 Mbit/s) than wireless (54 Mbit/s max) connections and supports the clearest possible transmission of sound and video.
  • Many software options are available for these purpose such as Skype, Google Video Chat, and Apple FaceTime.
  • Exchanging usernames and performing a test call before the interview appointment is advisable. In addition, exchanging cellular phone numbers in the case there is a problem connecting on the appointment date is recommended.
  • Encourage each candidate to test her/his equipment and locate a fast connection in advance of the schedule interview.
  • Ensure that all parties, arrangements, and back up plans are in place in advance of the scheduled interview time. This might avoid compromising the interview in the event of connection difficulties.
  • Attempt to arrange the technology to approximate a face-to-face interview. For example, position the camera in the vicinity of the screen used to view the candidate so that interviewers are looking in the direction of the candidate.
  • As with any interview, visit with each candidate at the beginning of the meeting to introduce all participants, describe the format and time restrictions, and set expectations for ground to be covered.

APPENDIX II (added in its entirety in May 2015)

Recommendations for Part-Time Instructor Qualifications, Position Postings, Hiring, Reappointment, and Evaluation

The intent of these guidelines is to provide a context where part-time instructors are treated fairly and consistently for their own benefit, for the benefit of the institutions where they teach, and for the benefit of the students they instruct. All three parties share a responsibility for the quality of educational process  

  1. Qualifications:
    1. Faculty members (including part-time faculty and graduate teaching assistants, as applicable) should be qualified by earned degrees and/or professional experience and/or demonstrated teaching competence for the subjects and levels they are teaching. Institutions should preference candidates with earned terminal degrees when appointing or reappointing part-time employees.
    2. CAA affirms that the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is the terminal degree in studio art practice. The Master of Fine Arts (MFA), the Master of Design (MDes), the Master of Art and Design (MAD), and the Master of Graphic Design (MGraph) are among the terminal masters degrees in design practice. (For additional information see the CAA Statement on Terminal Degree Programs in the Visual Arts and Design.)
    3. Academic degrees are a pertinent indicator of the teacher’s qualifications for instructing in theoretical, historical, and pedagogical subjects. In general, the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) and comparable doctorates are the appropriate terminal degrees in these fields; however, creative work, research, and publication are indicators of a teacher’s qualifications, productivity, professional awareness, and contribution to various aspects of art/design and art/design-related fields.
    4. Faculty members teaching graduate-level courses should represent the professional standards to which graduate students aspire in specific fields and specializations.

  2. Position Posting: 
    1. Employers should keep posted on their website current information regarding applications for part-time employment consideration. This posting shall include a description for each position available and a listing of materials to be submitted, when they may be submitted, and to whom they must be submitted.
    2. Employers should notify applicants in a timely manner that application materials have been received, will be kept on file for twelve months, and that the department will contact the applicant as necessary.

  3. Hiring: 
    1. When part-time faculty are to be hired the full-time faculty members with related and appropriate expertise, generally in the same academic program or unit, should be consulted and make recommendations to the appropriate administrator through search committees or other appropriate screening protocols. 
    2. Hiring recommendations should consider the professional competence, experience, and performance of candidates and their suitability for the open position(s).

  4. Reappointment:
    1. An employee should be granted continuing status upon completion of teaching at least one semester or session in each of two consecutive contract years in the same academic unit. Upon reaching continuing status, this status would be lost if the employee does not teach in the academic unit for a predetermined number of consecutive semesters/sessions.
    2. An employee with continuing status has a rebuttable presumption that she/he will be awarded a future part-time teaching appointment in the succeeding semester/session, dependent on academic unit needs and resources.
    3. The presumption of appointment can be rebutted if/when the academic unit determines that an alternative candidate possesses demonstrably superior qualifications for the instruction involved.
    4. The employer should provide written notification of such determination to the employee.
    5. The employer should provide to all employees with continuing status either: (1) written notice of appointment for one or more classes in the upcoming semester/session; or (2) written notice that the instructor will not be offered an appointment in the upcoming semester/session or, if applicable, in the foreseeable future. This written notice should be provided in a timely manner, ideally at least sixty days prior to the upcoming semester/session.

  5. Performance Evaluation:
    1. Employees should be evaluated, at a minimum, once per contract year. This evaluation should be facilitated by the hiring department and adhere to protocols established by the employing department.
    2. Employees should be evaluated based on student evaluations; other evidence of teaching performance, such as course materials and department-identified materials; and classroom visitations.
    3. Employees should conduct student evaluations, using the employer-approved instrument and process.
    4. Other evidence of teaching may be provided for evaluation, as long as it is consistent with employer-developed criteria.
    5. Classroom visitations may occur during each period of employment. Such visitations should be arranged with the department chair and follow department procedures.
    6. Other professional activities, such as publications, may be submitted by the employee in the evaluation process; however, since employees are employed to teach, the quality of their teaching is the paramount concern in the evaluation process and the absence of other professional activities cannot be used as evidence against the part-time faculty member.
    7. Employees should be given reasonable advance notice of the date by which they must provide materials for the purpose of evaluation and the kinds of materials that are sought.
    8. A copy of each evaluation shall be provided to the employee, with an additional copy placed in the employee’s department personnel file.
    9. In cases of unsatisfactory employment performance, the matter should be discussed with the employee prior to any action being taken and a written summary of such a discussion should be available at the request of the employee.